Why Oracle (and Java) sucks

We were investigating random crashes of a webapp, and it turned out to be a JAVA CORBA bug, so we  reported it to Oracle. Today, I got the following reply in my mail:

I own your service request *-*********** about a Java Corba problem.
Please understand that Java is a free product. Hence support (and bugfixes) can only be provided for Java SE contract customers.

Unfortunately, the Customer Support Identifier CSI#******** you entered does not entitle you to Oracle Java SE support. To submit a Service Request (SR) for Java SE when running your own or third party Java applications, a Java SE Support contract is required.

The bug you are referring is in state accepted indeed. There are no plans right now to fix it. Of course, if a contract customer requests a fix, then it will be fixed. Otherwise it might take quite some time until a fix becomes available.

[…]

Oracle Java Support starts at $10,000. Thank you very much, so leave the bug open and let other customers stumble upon it. Just yesterday I heard that armed US drones are using CORBA for communication, too… oh my.

Our approach might be using Nagios Eventhandlers to restart crashed application servers, as we got more than N+1 of those. Oracle’s mentality pisses me off…

7 thoughts on “Why Oracle (and Java) sucks

  1. Christian

    May I asked where you found this information that US drones are using Corba?
    Need to send the link to my developers 🙂
    (I’m a Middleware (Tomcat/JBoss/Apache) Administrator.)

    Reply
  2. Sean

    First of all, any article that starts out with the words “Oracle” and “sucks” gets my attention. I couldn’t agree more.

    I used to do support for Sun and then Oracle when they took over. I am actually very surprised that this person mentioned *anything* about the bug in that email: the fact that it is in accepted state and there are no plans to fix it. Oracle only does something if it adds money to Larry Ellison’s wallet.

    Reply
  3. hus

    I am not at Oracle side. I know that most of business owner are greedy.
    If they weren’t greedy, how can they be business owner?

    If you were Oracle, I think you will say the same as them.
    It’s not non-profit organization, Man.

    It’s normal that they cannot fulfil your request immeidately because
    they still have many more bugs that their customers are waiting for.
    Do you expect a first class service when you are in economic class?
    Of cause not. Same thing.

    By the way, if the armed US drones are using CORBA for communication
    like you said, you should be happy, man. If they found the same bug as you,
    they’d pay for it and you will get the fix for free in the next release.

    Reply
  4. Another Voice

    “Just yesterday I heard that armed US drones are using CORBA for communication, too… oh my.”

    They probably use CORBA with C/C++.

    JAVA + Embedded + Realtime + Performance? LOL

    Reply
  5. Someone

    hus said: By the way, if the armed US drones are using CORBA for communication
    like you said, you should be happy, man. If they found the same bug as you,

    I think if they find the same bug, the rest of their overall mission is likely not accomplished! For national security’s sake, I hope they don’t find the same bug.

    Reply
  6. Mick Russom

    Solution:

    Hold Cisco, HP, Google, Oracle, etc, criminally liable at the C-level (actual persons liable and put into prison) for leaving known defects in a product that could cause issues leading to the death of others. Simple.

    Tell the tech CEOs that if they play a game by leaving potentially deadly known defects in software they will go to prison. Not a fine, CEO goes to prison.

    This idea that known software defects are kept in the product until sufficient ransom is paid is out of control.

    Reply

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